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Change Strategy

Apr 11, 2010

When a new manager is hired, change will likely follow.  This isn’t a bad thing...unless the manager doesn’t implement the change thoughtfully.  If you find yourself in this position, don’t rush into change, be thoughtful, analytical, and make a plan!

 

A new manager may feel resistance to the change simply because the employees don’t know what is in store for them; it’s human nature and the new manager is a change in itself.  The employees may fear the unknown and just need a little time to adjust to the new style of leadership.  A new manager should be prepared to answer questions and to provide guidance and feedback to the employees. But, before additional change is implemented, a new manager may want to take time to become familiar with the current culture of the business.  A new manager also needs to build trust and get to know their team (as well as the business owner), and examine the history of the business and how things were done prior to he or she taking the position.  Employees should be engaged in conversations to find out what they feel is, or is not working in the business.  This will allow them to take ownership and might provide a foundation for the changes being considered. 

 

A new manager should make it clear what types of changes are being considered and for what reasons. Is it to keep up with technology, is it for efficiency or environmental reasons, is there a change in the market, are the changes due to financial matters, or is it competition that is driving change?  It will be very important for a new manager to understand the nature of the changes and the impact they will have, positive or negative so they can be clearly conveyed to the employees; good communication is key.  The greater the buy in from the team, the greater the chances are for positive change and success.  

 

 

Have you been in a position to impose change in a business?  What strategies worked for you?  More importantly, what strategies didn’t work and why?



Tags:
Category: Strategy

Jill Kline


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