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800-348-5194 (Toll Free in WY)
email:WSBDC@uwyo.edu

Opportunity-Ahead.gifPTAC - Finding Opportunities

 

If you are thinking about getting started in government contracting, the first thing to do is some market research about the types of opportunities that might be out there for your business. What is the likely dollar amount of your typical project or sale? Is it likely to be under the micro-purchase threshold (generally, $3000 or less), somewhere between $3,000 and $25,000, or more than $25,000? This question is important, because the processes are a little different depending on the dollar amount.

 

 

Sales under the micro-purchase threshold - $3,000 or less - cardholder can generally choose any vendor

  • Get to know the agency cardholders
  • Market to the agency contracting team and cardholders
  • Accept credit cards
  • Maintain government pricing that is fair, reasonable, and is equal to or less than your best customer pricing
  • Purchases/awards are often based on convenience to the purchaser
  • Provide the item or service required with on-time delivery
  • Keep a professional arm’s length relationship, be aware of ethics rules
  • Never split orders that exceed the micro-purchase threshold
  • Register in SAM and DSBS. For micro-purchases, this is not required,
    but it makes good business sense.

Sales between $3,000 and $25,000 - competition is required, but opportunities are not required to be advertised

  • Get to know the contracting officers
  • Market to the agency contracting team
  • Register in SAM
  • Payment made by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT)
  • Register in DSBS (not legally required, but many contracting officers use this database for market research; you can provide a capability statement, keywords, and references)
  • Accept credit cards (for actions less than $3,000)
  • Awards are generally based upon price; propose a price which is fair and reasonable
  • Provide the item or service required with on-time delivery
  • Be aware of small business certifications such as 8(a), Service-Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), Economically-Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (EDWOSB), and Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone). If you are eligible; they can give you a marketing advantage.
  • Keep a professional arm’s length relationship. Be aware of ethics rules.

Sales of $25,000 or more – competition is required and opportunities must be formally advertised

  • Get to know the contracting officers
  • Market to the agency contracting team
  • Search for opportunities in FedBizOpps
  • Register in SAM
  • Payment made by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT)
  • Register in DSBS (not legally required, but many contracting officers use this database for market research; you can provide a capability statement, keywords, and references)
  • Be familiar with the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR)
  • Understand that for many of the actions estimated to exceed $150,000 you will be in competition with large business
  • Propose a price that is fair and reasonable, but understand that very few awards made on price alone (READ the evaluation factors in the solicitation)
  • Provide the item or service required with on-time delivery
  • Be aware of small business certifications such as 8(a), Service-Disabled Veteran
  • Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB),
  • Economically-Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (EDWOSB), and
  • Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone). f you are eligible; they can give you a marketing advantage.
  • Watch for and respond to sources sought notices in FedBizOpps
  • Keep a professional arm’s length relationship. Be aware of ethics rules.
  • Are you responding to a Request for Quote (RFQ) (under $150,000), an Invitation for Bid (IFB), or a Request for Proposal (RFP)
  • Read the solicitation, read the contract.


Once you have a sense of the type of sales you expect to make, it makes good sense to establish some strategic goals for government contracting for your business. What percentage of your revenue does your business aspire to derive from government contracts? What amount of effort can your firm devote to reaching this goal? The PTAC can assist you with developing a step-by-step action plan to reach your goals!

 

Government Procurement Consulting:

Program Central Contact Information
Email PTAC
 

Brett Housholder

Program Manager
300 South Wolcott, Suite 300
Casper, Wyoming 82601
307.234.3203
Email Brett

 

Andi Lewis

Procurement Specialist

1400 E. College Dr.

Cheyenne, WY  82007

307.772.7372

Email Andi